James Woods
A writer who focuses on pieces about race, politics, culture, and technology — among other topics. Editor-in-chief of Perceive More!

A publication dedicated to challenging and creating new perceptions.

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Perceive More! strives to be a publication that features pieces that challenge our perception and broadens our understanding of complex issues in the world. From race, culture, politics, and more, the publication will offer takes on various topics and attempt to do what is often hard, see things from the other side. The publication is open to any and all perceptions and encourages healthy debate so that we can all learn from each other. Want to be a part of Perceive More!?

The publication is actively recruiting writers that submit pieces challenging us to see things differently. If you are interested in joining, please express so in the comment section below and your profile will be reviewed before you are accepted into the publication. Although this is a new publication, we are looking for quality written pieces that have clear takeaways. Perceive More!


As we approach MLK Day, White people really need to grapple with what Martin Luther King Jr would say about the current state of this country.

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Martin Luther King Jr at Pixabay

A friend of mine used to always ask me what Martin Luther King Jr would do/say whenever we got into an argument over racial injustice. When the Ferguson protest was happening back in 2014 over the killing of Michael Brown, I brought up the injustice of the situation to which my friend posed the question about MLK. She would say, “I get what the people are trying to do but protesting isn’t the answer. What would Martin Luther King say to the destruction occurring from those protests?”

I was always taken aback by this question because it was often the only defense she had in her argument. There were no other prominent Black figures she could name. Malcolm X, John Lewis, Bayard Rustin, James Farmer, Whitney Young Jr, and countless others were never mentioned. All she could remember about MLK was him preaching for nonviolence amongst civil rights activists, law enforcement personnel, and Americans as if he stood for nothing more. To simplify this man’s story to fit her narrative of inaction not only does a major disservice to his life but continues to this day by many Americans. …


Only thanks to healthcare workers’ sacrifices they continue making in tackling this pandemic.

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Picture of Author

Yesterday, I received my first dose of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine. It was the first time in a while that made me begin to believe there may be light at the end of the tunnel. A pandemic that has so far taken the lives of almost 400,000 Americans, receiving the vaccine let me know that it is possible for us to get a grasp on this devastating virus. Beyond that, I began to think about the impact it has had on healthcare workers, the people on the frontlines of this pandemic.

According to Registered Nursing, anywhere from 7–26% of healthcare workers have been infected with COVID-19. To put that into perspective, there are around 18 million healthcare workers in the US according to the CDC. On the low end, that would suggest that 1.26 million workers contracted COVID. While on the high end, that would put the number at 4.68 million workers. With the healthcare workforce being disproportionately female at 80%, COVID-19 has had a devastating impact on women in the economy. These are the same people that are continuing to fight the pandemic as January and February look to be the worst months. …


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Hello!

First and foremost, welcome to Perceive More! It has been a couple of days since the founding of this publication and we are already blowing well past my expectations. Since Monday, the publication has had over 1000 visitors and views and minutes read have been off to an incredible start.


Lana Del Rey’s tone-deaf message of being diverse and inclusive for her upcoming album cover is the latest instance of ignorance from the artist.

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Lana Del Rey performing in 2017 by Harmony Gerber at Wikimedia Commons

Elizabeth Woolridge Grant, known by her stage name Lana Del Rey, is an American singer-songwriter best known for her music that has themes of sadness, romance, and glamor. She has been a mainstay in pop culture since 2011 when she found viral success from her song “Video Games”. Throughout her career, she has been criticized for glamorizing abuse and in May 2020 falsely equated her work to be no different from Black artists like Nicki Minaj and Megan Thee Stallion.

In her now-famous Instagram post that started with Question for the culture, she questioned why other women can talk about being sexy and wearing no clothes but it is a problem when she does. The post drew widespread backlash from fans of the artists and critics who noted that the message was extremely tone-deaf and putting down the recent accomplishment of having four Black women in the top two Billboard positions at the same time. Thinking that she would have learned from that fiasco, she decided to recently post a caption about her upcoming album which shows her ignorance continues unabated. …


As major social media companies ban Trump from their platforms over inciting violence, it could mean more challenges to Section 230 and more extremists going to free speech platforms.

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Screenshot by Author of Trump’s suspended Twitter account

Facebook and Twitter made the decision this week to ban Donald Trump from their platforms, where the President had the largest followings. The companies stated that they made the decisions after they determined there was the risk of a further incitement of violence. The moves were a forceful repudiation of the President after years of Trump using both platforms to spread lies, misinformation, and conspiracy theories. Shortly after the ban took place, prominent Republicans called for a repeal of Section 230, stating that Big Tech should be on the same footing as other American companies. …


My fear of being outed as a kid, on top of the ideas pushed on my football team to be as masculine as possible made me leave the sport.

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Photo by Muyuan Ma on Unsplash

I started to play football by the time I entered kindergarten. My father was a college football player and always envisioned seeing his kids follow in his footsteps. Every Fall we would start the grueling season, spending weeknights at practice, waiting to do our homework when we got home. Practices were at least two hours long and they always started and ended the same way, with a run around the field. That practice paid off as we racked up wins and started to make a name for ourselves and the league. …


Trump spent the last few months of 2020 denying his loss to Biden, chastising Republicans that didn’t engage in his conspiracy theories, and encouraging his supporters to embrace baseless claims of voter fraud.

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Photo by Dalton Caraway on Unsplash

Since the Presidential election on November 3rd, Donald Trump has spent months trying to overturn it. Baselessly clinging to the idea of voter fraud and suppression, he has encouraged his base to defend him at every turn. It first started with him prematurely claiming victory in the early mornings after the election to holding out hope that the Electoral College would not certify the results to his last-ditch efforts of pressuring House and Senate Republicans to not certify the results. All of this has been deeply concerning, but the lasting consequences of these lies may be the undoing of the Republican Party. …


The rise of home gym workouts has promised something that is often unattainable, perfection.

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Photo by Steve Jurvetson at Wikimedia Commons

Over the past year, we have witnessed the meteoric rise of companies like Peloton and Mirror as millions of people decided to ditch their local gym in favor of these company’s offerings. Peloton membership grew from 1.4 million to 3.1 million subscribers and Mirror was purchased by Lululemon for $500 million. The rise of home gym workouts has brought with it celebrity-like status for the instructors of these companies. People like Robin Arzon and Ally Love are becoming household names. These companies and the instructors that work for them promise life-changing results that often never come.

Having a Peloton machine, Mirror, or any of the other home gym machines that are popping up seemingly every day has become trendy. These machines are very pricey, costing anywhere from $1500 to $5000 with a monthly membership fee, so to own one is to signify that you made it. Live classes are held daily with hundreds of classes being added to their libraries weekly. Having a shoutout in a class almost feels like a singer reaching out to hold your hand during a song or making eye contact with you. The problem with these machines is that people often buy them assuming they will come to look like the instructors that teach the class. …


There is a fine line between racial preference and prejudice and knowing the difference between the two may curb unconscious racism.

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Photo by Christina @ wocintechchat.com on Unsplash

Anyone of color has likely been on a dating app and seen the following on someone’s profile, “PREFER X RACE, please do not message me if you are of a different race. I’m not interested.” Messages like these are common nowadays as more people shift their dating habits to meeting others online. And with the pandemic accelerating the shift to online dating, it is more important than ever that we all understand the difference between preference and prejudice. There is often a fine line between the two.

Preference simply refers to a greater liking for one thing over other options available. For example, I could say that I prefer to eat apples but this doesn’t mean that I will not indulge in other fruits if apples are not available. It just means that if I had the option to choose from apples over other fruits available there is a good chance I am going to pick the apple. We all have preferences in life. Some people prefer to watch Netflix over Hulu, but they will not entirely rule out Hulu. If a good enough series comes on Hulu, then they would be likely to watch it over something on Netflix. Preference is not inherently dangerous until it becomes something closer to prejudice. …

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